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How booming is Australian tourism?

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Tourism is one of the main contributors to the Australian economy.  Statistics show that during the year 2015 there are as many as 7.4 million visitor arrivals in Australia. Last year alone, the country welcomed a booming 9.4 million visitor arrivals from various parts of the globe.

This, of course, is made possible, by Tourism Australia and the many programs it promotes to drive revenue through the use of tourism.

Top spots for tourism in Australia

Known for its extraordinary beaches and natural landscapes, Australia’s vast topography plays a great factor in tourism. It keeps visitors curious that they want to come back and explore more. Almost half of the international visitors land at the main tourist hub which is Sydney (primarily to take a good view of the famed Opera House), followed by Melbourne, and Brisbane which is the entrance point to the Great Barrier Reef. The past years also saw a 31% increase in tourists visiting Tasmania in the South coast. The majority of the tourists in the county are from China, followed by New Zealand, the US, the UK, Japan, and Singapore. According to a 2017 report, the effort of promoting Australia’s tourism in China has played a big factor in the increase are Chinese visitors who are contributing about billions in revenue.

How the digital plays a big factor in tourism

Tourism Australia invests heavily in promoting online and by getting influencers and celebrity ambassadors like Chris Hemsworth to promote the country. Visitors are motivated by social media and Australian tourism influencers to visit popular landmarks such as the Sydney Opera House, Sydney Harbour Bridge, Bondi Beach, Great Barrier Reef, and Uluru. According to Tourism Research Australia, tourism plays such a huge part in Australia’s economy, contributing 3.2% to GDP and 4.9% to employment in the past 2 years. By 2020, Tourism Australia expects to achieve more than $115 billion in overnight spend (up from $70 billion in 2009).

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